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Scots Pine

Pinus / sylvestris

your 360 images

360-degree model by Michigan Photography

MBGNA-B-006
This stunning Scots pine is one of the remaining original specimens from Dr. Maurice Seevers. It was much less developed when it was donated from his estate in 1975 (see our section ‘Cultures’ and ‘Thriving in Ann Arbor’ for context.) What we now see as the ‘front’ was originally the ‘back’. We will be creating a digital-image timeline of this tree as it shows the progression from a tree with potential to a specimen that garners respect.

Dr. Seevers’ choice of Scots pine reflects the post World War Two approach to bonsai that was emerging in America – use species that are available and then train them in a Japanese styling tradition. Scots pine are native from Scotland south to Greece and Turkey and east well into Siberia. Since the 1800s, Scots pine has easily been available in the United States as an ornamental and living Christmas tree. Its small needles likely made it appealing to Dr. Seevers.

    Quick Facts

  • Style: Formal Upright
  • Common name: Scots Pine
  • Species: sylvestris
  • Genus: Pinus
  • ID: MBGNA-B-006
  • Makeup: Evergreen
  • Year started: 1950
  • Year acquired: 1977
  • Trained since: 1975
your 360 images

360-degree model by Michigan Photography

MBGNA ID: MBGNA-B-006
This stunning Scots pine is one of the remaining original specimens from Dr. Maurice Seevers. It was much less developed when it was donated from his estate in 1975 (see our section ‘Cultures’ and ‘Thriving in Ann Arbor’ for context.) What we now see as the ‘front’ was originally the ‘back’. We will be creating a digital-image timeline of this tree as it shows the progression from a tree with potential to a specimen that garners respect.

Dr. Seevers’ choice of Scots pine reflects the post World War Two approach to bonsai that was emerging in America – use species that are available and then train them in a Japanese styling tradition. Scots pine are native from Scotland south to Greece and Turkey and east well into Siberia. Since the 1800s, Scots pine has easily been available in the United States as an ornamental and living Christmas tree. Its small needles likely made it appealing to Dr. Seevers.

    Quick Facts

  • Style: Formal Upright
  • Common name: Scots Pine
  • Species: sylvestris
  • Genus: Pinus
  • Plant ID: 17803
  • Makeup: Evergreen
  • Trained since: 1975
  • Year started: 1950
  • Year acquired: 1977

Moving to Leadership

A bold future beckons: engaging people new-to-bonsai while deepening our existing relationships and networks. Everything depends on our specimens being exemplary. As we on-board one of the continent’s most important private collections, we’ll be refining our existing collection and expanding our audiences. We need your help – spreading the word, coming to see the specimens through the year, learning more, and supporting us.

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